Tag Archives: family

Pregnancy with IBD Twitter chat

I know a lot of you followed along with my pregnancy with having an ostomy and IBD, so I am excited to take part in a Twitter chat discussing pregnancy, birth and parenthood while living with IBD as a part of the IBD Social Circle. I will be co-hosting with Amber Tresca of About.com, so we will be able to discuss our personal experiences with our families. Dr. Loftus of Mayo Clinic will be joining, as well, to give us the more scientific and medical perspective.

The Twitter chat will take place next Wednesday, March 9, at 12:00 p.m. EST. You can follow along with the hashtag #IBDSC and by following our Twitter accounts: @smlhughes@AboutIBD / @EdwardLoftus2.

I hope you’ll join us for this chat! We’d love to hear about your experiences and to answer some of your questions, as well.

IBD Social-Circle-TwitterChat 1 Final

**Janssen Biotech Inc. is paying for my time to advise on this chat. All thoughts and opinions expressed will be my own.

My son does not nap…

And that’s a big reason that I have not been around for a while. I apologize that I sort of fell off the face of the world for a while there. If I’m being totally honest… I think I was kind of hiding.

w no napIt started in October, when my son decided he no longer liked sleeping. (The 4-month sleep regression is real!) I was exhausted in every way possible. Thankfully, he has started sleeping through the night, but he still refuses to nap more than 30 minutes at a time and usually only twice, maybe three times a day. I left my full-time job to stay home with him, but I do have a part-time, work-from-home job, so any time I got him to go down for a nap, I’ve felt like I have to spend that time working. And even if I wasn’t working, there were a million things around the house to do. And then I sometimes just needed a little time for myself. I don’t like that it happened, but my blog kept getting pushed further down the list.
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On the other side of the curtain

I spent some time earlier this year on the other side of the hospital curtain. My best friend went in for emergency surgery. I was thankful that it was a day I was already planning on working from home, so I was able to drop everything to go see her when she woke up in recovery. It brought up a flood of emotions seeing her in that hospital wing, a little loopy from the anesthesia, but still looking beautiful.

hospital surgery recovery ostomies advocacy stephanie hughes bag colostomy ileostomy crohn's disease ulcerative colitis inflammatory bowel disease ibd ostomy blog stolen colon ileostomy colostomy urostomyThankfully, it was a successful surgery and she is doing great and was even able to leave the hospital just a few hours after the surgery. I spent those few hours there with her and her husband and the nurse who was monitoring everything.

This was one of the few times in my life that I was sitting in a waiting room, unsure of what was happening or going on with someone I really care about. When I went home later, I just crashed. I felt like I had been hit by a bus and there was nothing left. I tried to do some work the best I could, but mostly just curled up under a blanket on my couch and watched Gilmore Girls and eventually fell asleep.

It made me realize how much it takes out of you being the support for someone who is going through this sort of thing. I got a glimpse of what it must have been like for my husband and parents and sisters and friends every time I was admitted to the hospital and after each of my surgeries. It hurts me to think about all of those nights my husband stayed with me at the hospital, or when he had to return home while I was still there. I think about those 25 days I spent in the children’s hospital when I was 13 and can’t even imagine what that must’ve been like for my parents. And while It makes me sad to think of all they went through, it also makes me so thankful. I am thankful that I have such wonderful, loving people in my life that are willing to endure that and to be there for me, no matter how hard it is and no matter how much it takes out of them.

I realized at the beginning of the year that 2014 was the first year I hadn’t had surgery in three years and the first year I had not been admitted to the hospital in over five years. I had a period there where about every other month I was spending at least a night in the hospital, if not more. At that time, I don’t know that I could’ve imagined a period in life where I wouldn’t have to worry about when the next hospitalization might come.

Of course just a couple of months ago I had to deal with that again as I checked myself into the hospital 4 times in 4 weeks due to an intestinal blockage that was complicated by my pregnancy. By the third time I told my husband that I needed to go back to the hospital I could see how difficult it was for him. At times, I think it was harder on him than it was on me.

But during those times, both recently and in years past, through overnight stays and surgeries, I always had an army around me, helping to hold me up and get me through it. And now, I do know that I will never take for granted those people who have put their lives on hold and spent long hours waiting for news from the doctor on behalf of me or sleeping in the most uncomfortable chairs known to man.

Caring for someone with a chronic illness is not an easy thing. Those people have been through a lot. They live in a land of unknowns. For those of us who are dealing with an illness, we at least have a better understanding of what’s going on and we know our bodies well. But for those on the other side of the curtain, there’s little comfort they can find as they wish there was something more they could do, something to make the other person feel better. But they can simply sit and wait. Those of us with a diagnosis are not the only ones living with that disease. Our loved ones are impacted just as much sometimes, just differently. And these people are stronger than we sometimes give them credit for. I, for one, do not know where I would be without them. They give me strength to keep fighting and something worth fighting for.

Third trimester of pregnancy with an ostomy

pregnant baby conceive ostomies advice tips tricks stephanie hughes out of the bag colostomy ileostomy crohn's disease ulcerative colitis inflammatory bowel disease ibd ostomy blog stolen colon ileostomy colostomy urostomy third trimesterFor anyone who followed along with my pregnancy, you’ll know that the third trimester was not particularly kind to me. I had 4 separate hospital stays during weeks 32-35 for bowel obstructions (which you can read more about here and here), the last of which resulted in an induction and the birth of my son at just shy of 36 weeks.

Thankfully we were mostly done with all of the things that needed to be taken care of before baby’s arrival, but when the doctors first started discussing me delivering early, we jumped into high gear on wrapping up everything that was left to do. Here’s a little of what the final 3 months of my pregnancy were like.

  • I am happy to report that I did not have any major issues with my ostomy bags. They stayed put for about the same amount of time that they did previously without me really changing much in my routine. However, I’m sure this might be very different for other women, depending on how their stomach grows.
  • My stoma got huge! Seriously, it was kind of crazy how big it was. It was at least 20 mm bigger than it was prior to my pregnancy, so this is what changed most in my ostomy routine. I had to order larger size bags, because the wafers I normally use were not big enough. Cut-to-fit has definitely been the way to go, since I never knew quite how big it was going to be, and I just measured it every time before cutting.
  • Even though the stoma was a lot bigger, it was less prolapsed than it had previously been. During the 2nd trimester, I felt that my stoma was hanging out a little far. During the 3rd trimester is was still out far, but more rounded and looked basically like my stoma did previously, just twice the size.
  • Bowel obstructions are no joke. I definitely know now to pay more attention to what I eat during those final weeks, when baby and your intestines are running out of room. In any future pregnancies, I will probably restrict myself to a liquid diet starting much earlier.
  • Eating becomes a lot more complicated when you’re pregnant, because you have to consider not just what you’re eating, but what you’re feeding your child. This becomes even trickier when moving to a liquid diet. It’s difficult to get enough calories, while making sure you are consuming healthy calories, protein, calcium and all of the vitamins that you need. I had to start getting creative with the foods that I ate.
  • Hydration is so important!! I can’t stress this enough. I know I’ve had hydration issues for a long time, which were then compounded by getting an ostomy and have increased further since getting pregnant. It is so hard to stay fully hydrated, and I’m sure dehydration played a role in my bowel obstructions.
  • nst baby ostomyI started getting a bunch more tests done once I started getting bowel obstructions. I had a number of what’s called a non-stress test, which monitors the baby for an extended period of time, making sure the heart rate stays where it should. They have to wrap these straps around you, and almost all of the nurses were concerned about bothering my bag, but it really didn’t cause any issue for me at all.
  • The bag remained easy to empty. I was worried about the logistics of trying to empty it into the toilet, but found that it was really not any different from before. I just had to sit a little farther back on the toilet seat.
  • I mentioned previously that my ostomy became more visible through my clothes, and that definitely remained the case. Thankfully, there are lots of options to help keep it less visible, such as wearing flowier tops or wearing a maternity band.
  • Sleeping was not easy, no matter what you do. Pillows help, but my bag did get in the way sometimes, especially since you’re supposed to lay on your side and it can get squished. However, I did not have any actual incidents with it leaking because I was laying on it or anything like that.
  • I did NOT have a ton of people touch my belly. (Hallelujah!) And no strangers felt the need to do so. Not really a big fan of people touching my stomach at any time, pregnant or not.
  • Thankfully, my pregnancy did not really bother my stoma site. On occasion I got a kick over in that direction, but nothing too bad. Again, I assume this could be very different based on the baby’s position, but I’m glad to not have had to deal with it during this pregnancy.
  • Of course I did end up giving birth 4 weeks early, but thankfully the delivery went smoothly and my son was born perfectly healthy. I’ll share more on his birth in the future.

For any other mommas out there who have been through/are going through pregnancy with an ostomy, what was your experience like? For those who have not, what are some of your concerns if you decide to do so?

Here’s a little more about my experience getting pregnant with an ostomy and my first trimester and second trimester with an ostomy.